Irish Family History Society

Connecting People With Their Irish Roots

Back To Our Past, RDS Dublin 19 to 21 October 2018 – Talks

All talks are free to attend and places offered on a first-come-first-served basis

Friday 19 October

12 noon
Delving into Northern Ireland family and local history: Getting started online and at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI)

By Wesley Geddis, Deputy Head of Records Management, Cataloguing and Access at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland .

 1pm

Things my Granny told me: Writing family history on Ancestry and how it can develop yourresearch by Dr Jennifer Doyle

 2pm

How to preserve your family history documents.

Christine Deakin of Irish Genealogical Solutions advises on the preservation of family documents and photographs, covering which products to use and not to use and the correct methods of storing items to prevent the deterioration of family history material

3pm

Examining the vast genealogical resources at Glasnevin Cemetery

1.6 million souls are buried in Glasnevin Cemetery since first opening in 1832, and Glasnevin Trust hold a burial record for each and every one of those burials.

If you would like to know more about the vast record database at Glasnevin, why not join Resident Genealogist, Lynn Brady, for a comprehensive workshop on the burial records, what they contain and how they can help you with your family history research. You will learn how to use the Glasnevin Trust website, how to access the records, and Lynn will also give advice, information, hints and tips that will help you trace your ancestors through the various sources available nationwide.

You will also receive a €10 genealogy voucher for the Trust website to start you on your search!

 4pm

Using the National Archives to research your ancestors: an introduction

This session will outline the principal archives available to those who wish to undertake genealogical research in the National Archives.

 

Saturday 20 October

12 noon

How to preserve your family history documents.

Christine Deakin of Irish Genealogical Solutions advises on the preservation of family documents and photographs, covering which products to use and not to use and the correct methods of storing items to prevent the deterioration of family history material

1pm

Researching a 19th-century convict ancestor in the National Archives

This session will describe the archives available in the National Archives to those who wish to undertake research into a convict ancestor and how they can be used.

 

2pm

Tracing  20th century immigrants to the United States

Joe Buggy, Ancestry

 3pm

Examining the vast genealogical resources at Glasnevin Cemetery

1.6 million souls are buried in Glasnevin Cemetery since first opening in 1832, and Glasnevin Trust hold a burial record for each and every one of those burials.

If you would like to know more about the vast record database at Glasnevin, why not join Resident Genealogist, Lynn Brady, for a comprehensive workshop on the burial records, what they contain and how they can help you with your family history research. You will learn how to use the Glasnevin Trust website, how to access the records, and Lynn will also give advice, information, hints and tips that will help you trace your ancestors through the various sources available nationwide.

You will also receive a €10 genealogy voucher for the Trust website to start you on your search!

 4pm

What’s in a name? Lorna Moloney of Merriman Research explains

Clans and surnames of Ireland are legendary.  The Irish naming system provides unique identifying markers for families from the 11th century

 

Sunday 21 October

 

12 noon

An A to Z guide to DNA testing and understanding the results.  Daniel Eini of My Heritage explains

 

2.00pm

How to trace your ancestors that went to Scotland

Dr Irene O’Brien, of Glasgow City Archives, concentrates on  elusive Irish ancestors in Glasgow’s unrivalled poor law records (1m) dating from 1845.  The talk will describe the Scottish system and the documentation of large numbers of Irish applicants, many born pre-civil registration and some back to the 18th century.  The records add vital genealogical data, recording details of 3 generations of the family, including many staying in Ireland. As well as making these links, they also provide a taste of what life was like for large swathes of the population in Glasgow.

 

3.00pm

TBA

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